PMK demands fuller probe into Lankan torture centre

The secret 12-cell prison had markings on the walls that indicated detainees were kept there till 2010 – one year after the nearly three-decade-long war against the LTTE ended, the group had said. UN experts yesterday had said they discovered an illegal detention centre hidden inside a naval base in eastern Sri Lanka. Post-civil war detainees including Tamils were allegedly tortured there, they had said urging the Lankan government to launch a thorough probe. A day after discovery of an illegal detention centre by UN experts in a Sri Lankan naval base where Tamils were allegedly tortured, PMK today demanded the Centre to take steps to send an international team there for a comprehensive probe, the Press Trust of India (PTI) reported.“The Central government should take steps to send an international team to Sri Lanka to carry out a comprehensive probe into past and continuing torture centres and for punishing those responsible for it,” PMK chief Ramadoss said. “This news of a torture centre is not shocking as it is a known truth that several such centres had been in existence all along where Tamils, who raised their voice against Sri Lanka, were tortured,” he alleged in a statement here. “It is not known how many more such torture centres continue to function and about those that had existed,” he said, and reiterated his demand that the Centre should prevail upon Lanka to release all Tamil prisoners.Wrapping up its 10-day official visit to Sri Lanka, a three-member team of the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances had said it had found an illegal detention centre in the eastern district of Trincomalee where people had been tortured. read more

UN Childrens Fund challenges G8 to step up to plate on AIDS

The head of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) today challenged the leaders of the world’s richest nations meeting at the G-8 summit next week to adopt a “tide-turning approach” to the global AIDS crisis or else face the opprobrium of allowing millions more people to needlessly suffer and die.The heads of government from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States, along with the European Union, meeting on 1-3 June in Evian, France, must summon the collective leadership, resources and political will needed to tackle the global HIV/AIDS crisis, which is increasingly affecting children and young people, UNICEF Executive Director Carol Bellamy said.Ms. Bellamy praised US President George W. Bush’s signing on Tuesday of a $15 billion emergency AIDS bill, saying it raises the ante for other major donor nations.“The $15 billion could have huge impact for the 14 African and Caribbean nations it is meant to reach,” she said in a statement. “But the overwhelming majority of all people living with HIV or AIDS today – 95 per cent of them – have absolutely no access to treatment or care. For them, HIV is a death sentence.”Noting that in three countries not covered by the US plan – Lesotho, Swaziland and Zimbabwe – a third of all young women between the ages of 15 and 24 are HIV-positive, she added: “To corner the virus, all countries – rich and poor –must step up to the plate. And the global response must focus on children and young people – because they’re hardest hit, and because their choices will determine the course of the epidemic.”Schools are the most effective tool for curbing infection, she said. “Education can empower young people – especially girls – with a strong foundation of knowledge, skills and confidence needed to protect themselves and their communities. Education can chip away at the fear, stigma and discrimination that keep young people from seeking voluntary counselling, testing and treatment. And only education can give young people the economic and social capabilities to thrive in a more equal world,” she added.For its part the World Food Programme (WFP) has put together a white paper on preventing and mitigating food crises in sub-Saharan Africa for G-8 leaders to consider.Noting that some 196 million Africans are undernourished, and 40 million now suffer from severe food shortages, WFP suggests specific steps that G-8 nations can take to make emergency responses to food crises more effective. read more

African political and business leaders focus on intellectual property at UNbacked forum

Ministers for science and technology from approximately 20 countries, research and development institutions and entrepreneurs are joining WIPO, the Japan Patent Office and the Government of Tanzania to see how intellectual property (IP) can be used to promote innovation and creativity.“Intellectual property is an indispensable mechanism for translating knowledge into commercial assets – IP rights create a secure environment for investment in innovation and provide a legal framework for trading in intellectual assets,” WIPO Director General Francis Gurry told the opening of the African Conference on the Strategic Importance of Intellectual Property Policies to Foster Innovation, Value Creation and Competitiveness.The two-day conference in Dar es Salaam will also address the importance of innovation to address some of today’s most pressing global challenges, such as public health, food security and climate change, and assist countries in developing national innovation strategies. Investment in knowledge creation, and the maintenance of a robust and balanced IP system, should feature prominently in any strategy to ensure sustainable economic growth, Mr. Gurry noted. Among its projects, WIPO oversees public databases central to the UN’s wider efforts to create an open, inter-connected and inclusive IP knowledge-sharing infrastructure. The Geneva-based agency recently enlarged its Global Brand Database, which now lists 10.9 million national data records from collections made available by Algeria, Australia, Canada, Egypt, Estonia, Morocco, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates and the United States. Meanwhile, ministers and senior officials taking part in the conference now underway will remain in Dar es Salaam to participate in a meeting jointly organized by WIPO and the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) on 14 March.ECOSOC is one of the principal bodies of the UN and is responsible for coordinating the economic and social work of the Organization, as well as the work of WIPO and 13 other UN specialized agencies, their functional commissions and five regional commissions. read more

Transport Committee hears from SMMT on road safety

On Wednesday, Paul Everitt, SMMT chief executive, gave evidence to the House of Commons Transport Select Committee as part of its inquiry into road safety. The contribution of the automotive industry to reducing road casualties and injury rates was highlighted during the course of the hearing. He outlined a number of vehicle safety technologies that are currently available in the market place but stressed that financial incentives, such as reductions in insurance premiums, are needed to promote their uptake among consumers. With the upcoming tailpipe CO2 emissions regulation in mind, SMMT highlighted that environmental and safety regulations sometimes give rise to competing demands that need to be balanced.The European Commission’s regular car price survey released this week shows that UK prices fell by 1% last year. This compares dramatically with the increases in fuel prices, VED and insurance faced by most motorists. Raising the cost of motoring is frequently claimed to encourage environmental advancements. Yet the greatest gains in environmental performance, safety and security have been delivered by vehicle and component manufacturers. The investment in new technology, commitment to quality and productivity means that real and measurable improvements have been delivered at a fraction of the cost of environmental taxes. Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) read more

Opinion 5 questions for Ohio State Rutgers matchup

Sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott (15) carries the ball during a game against Cincinnati on Sept. 27 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 50-28.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorFor the first time ever, the Ohio State Buckeyes and Rutgers Scarlet Knights are set to meet on the football field. The matchup also marks the first time the Scarlet Knights will play a Big Ten game on the road.With so many firsts, and so many unknowns, there are a plethora of storylines to watch in the matchup. The Lantern sports editors picked five of the most important things to look for in the game.1. Will the Buckeyes be able to force Gary Nova turnovers?It has been well-documented that Rutgers senior quarterback Gary Nova is turnover-prone. With Nova coming off of an impressive performance in which he tossed for 404 yards through the air and three scores against Michigan, the Buckeye defense will have to do its due diligence to slow Nova and the Scarlet Knights down. The Rutgers run game is average at best, ranking ninth in the conference, which has forced the Scarlet Knights to throw the ball early and often in recent weeks. If they can force Nova into his old habits, the Buckeyes should succeed as Nova has thrown 46 career interceptions, five of which came in his first Big Ten game against Penn State. 2. Will sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott have his third-straight 100-yard game?After struggling to get off to a strong start, Elliott is coming off of back-to-back 100-yard rushing games against Cincinnati and Maryland, respectively. Getting his third-straight 100-yard game could prove to be easier than some think.While the Rutgers defense ranks tied for third in the country in sacks, they struggle to stop the run as they rank eighth in the conference in yards allowed on the ground. If the Buckeye offensive line has improved as much as many think they have, Elliott will have a chance to rack up considerable yards for a third straight game. 3. Can J.T. Barrett make a Heisman Trophy push?I know, I know. we are crazy. But are we really?After the recent Todd Gurley and Jameis Winston fallout, this could be the most wide open Heisman race in years.With that said, Barrett will have a chance to shine on national television for the next four weeks as games against Rutgers, Penn State, Illinois and Michigan State are scheduled to be televised on either ABC, ESPN or ESPN2.In addition, aside from Saturday’s game against Rutgers, all of those games are set for 8 p.m. kickoffs, putting Barrett and the Buckeyes in the spotlight for three straight weekends.Closing that stretch of games is the Michigan State matchup, one that most are claiming will be the de facto Big Ten Championship game. If Barrett can help the Buckeyes win out, and impress during prime time, there is a chance the redshirt-freshman could earn an invite to New York.However, it all starts with Rutgers on Saturday.4. How will a second early-season bye week effect the Buckeyes on the field?More than anything else, OSU coach Urban Meyer has made it clear that he didn’t want to have a week off after the Buckeyes beat Maryland on Oct. 4.If it were up to him, they would have kept on rolling after the 52-24 win, but it’s not.Instead, OSU had to take an off-week and get ready for a two-week gap between taking the field for an actual game. For some teams, that can be needed rest. For others, it can simply stunt momentum.It’s likely the Buckeyes will either have an extremely fast or an extremely slow start depending on how the players took the time off. If a slow start is in fact the case, look for OSU to be in an early hole with a need to scramble back late in the game.5. Will freshman running back Curtis Samuel be worked back into the fold?Through the first few games of the season, an argument could have been made that Samuel was the best running back on OSU’s roster.He might well be just that someday, but it’s clear that Elliott is the guy for the 2014 Buckeyes, especially considering Samuel missed the Maryland game with a leg injury. Meyer said he’s back and ready to go, but what will be the real point of rushing him back into the lineup when Elliott has been dominant for two consecutive games?Samuel has a bright career ahead of him, but an untimely injury might have put a damper on what could have been a standout first season in Columbus.The matchup between OSU and Rutgers is scheduled for Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. read more

Volvo Penta boosting the road to electromobility

first_imgAdvances in electric-driven technology and improved battery capacity are powering Volvo Penta’s pledge to offer electrified solutions by 2021. Volvo Penta says its engineers are securing, testing and evaluating electric drive solutions that are set to help power the next generation of the company’s products. Collaboration is the key, and Volvo Penta is working closely with customers and suppliers to explore viable electric driveline solutions.“The needs of environmental sustainability and customers’ business requirements are getting ever closer, as electrified options become increasingly feasible,” says Peter Granqvist, chief technology officer at Volvo Penta. “The individual needs across industries such as construction, mining and materials handling do vary – just as they do for commercial and leisure marine applications. However, there is now a clear trend from all customer groups: the need for cleaner, quieter and more efficient drivelines.”In leveraging the Volvo Group’s proven platforms, harnessing the latest technology for energy storage in batteries, and in collaborating directly with customers, Volvo Penta will create win-win electromobility solutions that allow customers to move their businesses forward.An undoubted benefit of being part of the Volvo Group is access to advanced technology. Volvo Penta is further developing the proven electromobility platform that has successfully been used by Volvo’s buses and trucks divisions for many years. The company’s new workshop focusing on electrification is located opposite the Volvo Group’s 140-strong electromobility team. Synergies between different applications are being explored in close collaboration, as is the development of new solutions for Volvo Penta’s customers.The limiting factors for creating commercially viable heavy-duty electric solutions have been battery capacity, weight and charging times. But developments over the past decade have led to the proliferation of new battery powered devices from smartphones, drones, and electric bikes all the way up to grid-scale energy storage systems.“This wide deployment of battery technology means there is increasing knowledge and capacity to be shared across industries,” says Niklas Thulin, director of electromobility at Volvo Penta. “Increasing energy density and smaller batteries allow for novel machine designs. And lower cost means the cost of ownership is reaching a point where, for several applications, it will be more profitable to operate an electric machine rather than one with a conventional engine. In addition, shorter charging times and more available charging infrastructure at customers’ depots and other hub locations will also supercharge the case for electrification.”One key driver for Volvo Penta in developing electric solutions is to support customers in future-proofing their businesses. As such, the company is collaborating with customers to assess the best options and to run pilot projects to determine the direction of future product development.“It’s essential to spend time with customers – both OEMs and operators – to understand how they can benefit from electrification, how machines and equipment are intended to be used, and how and where charging can be incorporated in the operation,” says Thulin. “By understanding all the details we can propose a system fine-tuned to their needs.”last_img read more

Microsoft taps Spock in Xbox One promo that really hits the mark

first_imgHardcore gamers may not be fans of Microsof’s decision to only partially focus on game quality in promoting the Xbox One, but this latest advertisement featuring Zachary Quinto hits with the precision of a Vulcan nerve pinch.There’s been a series of missteps in introducing Microsoft’s next-gen console, but the overall message was never one of them. The idea of an “everything” console linking together the devices housed in your entertainment center is a powerful message to send. If Microsoft can convince users to put the Xbox One in their living room, in between the cable box and the TV, they will be able to do what no one else is doing on the TV right now.Microsoft’s “Invitation” promo is everything it needs to be. The idea that the Xbox One is not simply sitting there waiting for you to turn it on, but actively pulling you back in front of the TV, is unique because Microsoft can actually deliver on that experience.The ability to Skype with your friends right after something interesting happens on TV, or the option to just curl up on the couch and ask for a movie to start playing has the potential to be a huge deal for more than just gamers.Most importantly, Microsoft made sure to also focus on the right games for their demographic. Titanfall, FIFA 14, and of course Dead Rising 3 all get not-so-subtle references during the video. It all comes together to accurately focus on the strengths of the Xbox One, and as long as Microsoft can actually deliver this experience it will make a huge difference in the life of the console.last_img read more

Anzac grants for communities

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram $100,000 is being offered to each federal electorate to commemorate the centenary of the First World War on Anzac Day. The grants, part of the Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program which Prime Minister Julia Gillard announced in February will enable communities to celebrate Anzac Day in their own way. While there are no longer any living veterans of this war, there are many Australian families with links to our first Anzacs, and the grants are a way to engage them in a constructive way. As part of the initiative, a special Electorate Committee will be created to assist in seeking the views of the community on how best to commemorate the Centenary. Applications will open on 31 May 2013 and close on 28 February 2014. Grant funding will be available from 1 July 2013. The guidelines and application form are also available from the Anzac Centenary website at www.anzaccentenary.gov.aulast_img read more

Applying for a Tax File Number in Greece

first_imgAll residents of Greece who are 18 years of age or older must request and obtain a Tax File Number (TFN), known in Greek as ‘Αριθμός Φορολογικού Μητρώου’ or ‘Α.Φ.Μ.’. Physical and legal persons who reside abroad are required to possess a Taχ File Number if they own property located in Greece, engage in any real estate or commercial transaction in Greece or earn income from a Greek source. Residents of Greece should apply for a TFN at the Greek Tax Office located nearest to their place of residence or business. Non-residents of Greece should obtain their TFN from the Special Tax Office for Foreign Residents and should ensure that they remain registered with this Tax Office in order to avoid being subject to imputed taxation and/or taxation of their worldwide income. All applicants for a Tax File Number must submit a completed and signed M1 form. In addition, Greek citizens who are residents of Greece are required to present their original Greek Identification Card and to submit a photocopy thereof. European Union nationals who reside in Greece are required to present their original passports or Identification Cards and to submit a photocopy of the document presented. Third country nationals who reside in Greece are required to produce their passports and valid residence permits and to submit photocopies thereof. Non-residents of Greece are required to present and submit photocopies of their passports or other official forms of identification. The applicant may authorise a third party to request and obtain the number on his/her behalf; however, a Power of Attorney document must be presented. This document may either be signed before a Greek Consular Authority abroad or before a foreign Notary. In the latter case, the document must be certified by Apostille in the country where it was signed. A Greek Tax File Number which is no longer in use, as a consequence of death, must be formally removed from the Greek Taxpayer Register. The following documents must be presented in order to formally remove a number from the Register: – a certified copy of the Taxpayer’s Death Certificate; – a suitable Power of Attorney document from the heirs of the deceased; – a Certificate of Next of Kin; – a certified copy of the Last Will and Testament or a Court of the First Instance certificate indicating that there is no such document. Arsinoi D. Lainioti is an Athens based lawyer. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Air traffic increases in Greece while cruise sector plummets

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram According to data collected in the first half of 2018, passenger traffic in Greece is witnessing an all-time rise having increased by 45 per cent over the past four years.Following the acquisition by Fraport of 14 Greek regional airports, air traffic went up by 10.9 percent, seeing 4.36 million passengers got through the airports, withe the busiest airports being Athens, Iraklio, Rhodes, Thessaloniki and Hania.Santorini, Kos and Cephallonia, on the other hand reported double-digit annual passenger increases with numbers reaching up to and over 3,500 flights per day.The annual income estimated to derive from the arrivals to Greece especially during summer months is being received positively by Greece’s lenders.As a result, a construction license has been issued for a major 90 million euro renovation of Thessaloniki’s Macedonia Airport.Greece’s tourism market keeps expanding allowing more job openings to the aviation sector. Since 2014, Greece’s Civil Aviation Authority (YPA) hired an additional 70 air traffic controllers to meet safety standards due to increased traffic levels.Piraeus cruise port. Photo: Maritime TrafficWhile Greek airports have every reason to celebrate, ports, and especially the cruise ship sector is suffering a drop in bookings way below 2017’s levels.Last year, in fact, also witnessed a significant slide in the specific – and lucrative – tourism sub-sector, a confusing development given Greece’s healthy holiday and travel numbers over recent years.“We witnessed the most profound decrease in 2017,” said Theodoros Kontes, president of the Association of Cruise Ship Owners and Maritime Agencies (EEKFN)”“Compared to recent years, [it is] down by 20 per cent … but our initial forecasts were for a small correction of around 2 per cent for 2018, and a gradual upward trend in the coming years. Instead, after researching travel agencies and ports it appears that 2018 will post another significant decrease – 2 per cent for docking of vessels, and 3.2 per cent for arrival of passengers.”Kontes has recorded a total of 3,353 cruises scheduled to take place in 2018, which translates into 4.48 million passengers; a reportedly lower number compared to the 2017 statistics.last_img read more

Un nouveau cas mortel de grippe aviaire identifié en Indonésie

first_imgUn nouveau cas mortel de grippe aviaire identifié en IndonésieMardi, le ministère de la Santé indonésien a annoncé qu’un jeune homme était décédé des suites de la grippe aviaire. Il s’agit du premier cas mortel de la maladie dans le pays depuis trois mois.Dix jours après l’annonce d’un premier cas mortel en Chine, l’Indonésie vient tout juste d’annoncer qu’un jeune homme était également décédé de la grippe aviaire dans le pays qui est le plus touché par le virus H5N1. Cela faisait trois mois qu’aucun décès n’avait été signalé, depuis la mort le 10 octobre de deux enfants de cinq et dix ans. Jusqu’alors, l’Indonésie n’avait pas connu de cas mortel depuis mai 2010.À lire aussiDes écologistes viennent au secours de deux orangs-outans victimes de l’huile de palme”Les résultats de tests ont confirmé qu’il était atteint de grippe aviaire”, a indiqué à l’AFP le responsable des maladies infectieuses au ministère de la Santé, Tjandra Yoga, en référence à la victime âgée de 23 ans. Le jeune homme résidant dans la banlieue nord de Jakarta, a succombé à une forte fièvre le week-end dernier, après avoir été à tort diagnostiqué comme atteint de dengue, selon le quotidien Jakarta Post.Selon le dernier bilan de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), qui ne comprend pas ce dernier décès annoncé, la maladie a fait 150 morts en Indonésie depuis 2003, sur un total de 339 dans le monde. Si le nombre de malades a sérieusement diminué depuis un pic atteint en 2006-2007, les craintes de résurgence ont resurgi avec l’annonce d’un cas mortel en Chine, le 31 décembre, le premier dans ce pays depuis 18 mois. Mais les autorités ont tenu à rassurer la population, soulignant que le virus ne se transmet que de l’animal à l’homme, ce qui limite la contamination. En revanche, l’Indonésie est souvent considérée comme un maillon faible dans la lutte contre la propagation de la grippe aviaire : en effet, de nombreux ménages continuant à vivre en contact constant avec des volailles élevées pour leur consommation, malgré une loi l’interdisant. Le 10 janvier 2012 à 10:11 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Four young filmmakers from the YK Delta tackle climate change

first_imgKatie Demientieff from Akiuk is documenting climate change as part of a film workshop. (Photo by Katie Basile / KYUK)Climate change is slowly disrupting the subsistence lifestyle in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. And some of its younger residents are documenting the changes they’re seeing through film.Listen nowIn a two-week workshop hosted by the Lower Kuskokwim School District in Bethel, four high school students composed a short documentary about the climate change impacts to their communities and subsistence lifestyle.The film opens with Nicolai Fisher, one of the filmmakers who lives in Napaskiak, narrating the importance of subsistence in Western Alaska.“Yup’ik and Cup’ik people have subsisted off the land and sea for thousands of years. What our ancestors taught us is our way of life,” Fisher said.The film explores the shifting weather patterns they are seeing in their short lifespans. Changing animal migratory patterns and less snow on the ground are key themes in the piece.“I’ve noticed the moose going to the coast and the geese heading more and more out of our villages,” Fisher said in an interview.Erosion is another issue. Sam Tinker, a high school student who lives in Akula, has witnessed erosion worsening in his 16 years.“The land was starting to fall apart into the water and the river was almost high enough that it’s around your knees and waist area,” Tinker said.For Katie Demientieff, the youngest of the filmmakers at 14, who lives in Akiak, making the documentary was a way to learn about what the climate was like decades ago.“I chose climate change because I wanted to know how it was in the past and how it is now,” Demientieff said.All four students see the film as a wakeup call to their communities.“I want to spark the mind of the people on why climate change is so important and the subsistence way of living of our land is so important to the Yup’ik and Cup’ik people,” Tinker said.A total of twelve students completed three films on different topics during the workshop. The videos can be found on the school district’s YouTube channel.last_img read more

President seeks report on suicides by Telangana students

President seeks report on suicides by Telangana students

first_imgHyderabad: President Ram Nath Kovind has sought a report from the Telangana government on the suicides by 27 students over the alleged goof-up in the results of Intermediate examinations. Union Home Ministry sent a letter to Telangana Chief Secretary S.K. Joshi, directing him to furnish a report. Ashok Kumar Pal, Under Secretary in the Ministry of Home Affairs along with his letter dated Aug 7 forwarded a letter received from President’s Secretariat. Also Read – With 61 feet high, Khairatabad Ganesh claimed to be tallest idol in India Advertise With Us The central office also marked a copy of his letter to BJP Telangana state unit President K. Laxman, who along with other party leaders had submitted a memorandum to Kovind last month, urging him to seek a report from the Telangana government. The BJP delegation had also appealed to the President to examine the possibility of advising the Governor to order a judicial probe into the bungling by the education authorities. Also Read – Unidentified assailants killed a person in Saidabad PS limits Advertise With Us It alleged that the students ended their lives due to the bungling by the Board of Intermediate Education in the results of intermediate (Classes 11 and 12) examinations. Of the 9.43 lakh students who appeared in the exams, 5.6 lakh had cleared it. After the announcement of results in April, goof-up by the authorities in the evaluation of answer scripts and processing the results came to light, triggering a huge public outcry and massive protests by opposition parties and student bodies. Advertise With Us Chief Minister K. Chandrashekhar Rao later announced free re-verification of answer sheets of all the failed students. In May, the BIE announced results of re-verification of answer scripts of over 3.82 lakh students who had failed to obtain pass marks. Following this process, 1,137 students, who were earlier declared “failed”, cleared the exams. According to the BIE, of the 23 students who committed suicide and three who attempted, re-verification of their answer scripts showed that there is no change from fail to pass. The student bodies and NGOs claimed that 26 students had ended their lives. The BJP, however, put the number at 27.last_img read more

Girls of Color Town Hall Meeting

Girls of Color Town Hall Meeting

first_imgPlease Join Morgan State University, in partnership with the African American Policy Forum, for the next National Town Hall Meeting on Women and Girls of Color , 12 p.m., April 25, at  Morgan State University Student Theater, 1700 East Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore. Contact Anika Simpson anika.simpson@morgan.edu for more information.last_img

Are You Listed Tips for Using SEO Directories Today

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Free Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now October 10, 2014 4 min read Although online directories are still a part of every complete strategy for search engine marketing and optimization, they don’t hold the power they once did. We spoke with marketing experts on the role online directories should play now and how they fit in to your digital strategy. Here’s what they said:Understand lists’ new roleGetting a website listed on a directory used to be to be an easy path to traffic and success. In those days, getting linked on a site with a high page rank would increase your score with search engines. These days, however, Google and other search engine companies have grown wise to how websites and their owners have exploited the previous system. “These links worked extremely effectively for boosting rankings, but they violated Google’s Webmaster guidelines, as the only purpose they served was to boost rankings unnaturally for the linked websites,” says Jayson DeMers, founder and CEO of AudienceBloom.Eric Siu of Single Grain says that directories should be seen as just one more tool in your toolbox, and not your first and only option. “Directories still hold a little bit of value, but.. you’re better off creating exceptional content that stands out and promoting it through social media.” He says you should focus more on original content that’s compelling and share-worthy and building real relationships with real authorities in your space. Think about what users will be searching for and what they want. Content that answers the queries your customers are typing into search engines will be more valuable than mere directory listings.Related: 4 Secrets to Multichannel SuccessQuality over quantity?When considering directories, look for ones that use editors and require fees. Each of our experts recommends Dmoz.org, an open-content directory that’s maintained by a community of volunteers called the Open Directory Project. “That’s one of the largest directories on the web,” marketing consultant Brian Honigman says. “Google and all of the search engines take it into consideration when they decide how to best categorize your website.” Dmoz has human editors who oversee every application to ensure accuracy, a sharp contrast to the vast majority of online directories, that are automated, easy to manipulate, and more likely to be cue punishment by Google.DeMers also recommends getting your site listed on botw.org and Yahoo’s business directory. “[These] can help with SEO because they are typically considered strong links from respected, editorially-selective publishers,” he says.Beyond that, be diverse but picky. The money spent on getting listed in online directories could be spent elsewhere, especially if you’re a young, cash-strapped business. “The most common way to mess up is to get listed in too many low quality [directories] that Google would consider spammy,” DeMers says.Adds Siu, “You’re probably better off spending that $200 somewhere else.”Related: 5 Ecommerce Mistakes to Avoid: A Newbie’s GuideBe professionalSince the modern directories that actually improve your SEO are all carefully moderated by human editors, ensure that your site is fully optimized and professional before submitting. For instance, your pages should be easy to read, with type that’s clear and legible. “The only reason you wouldn’t be accepted is if your website was a mess and didn’t look credible,” Honigman says.Don’t be cleverYou should abandon all of the old, spam-driven tactics when you submit your site. “Another way to mess up is to use exact-match keyword-rich anchor text when linking to your website,” he says. Any attempt to exploit the system will only get your site flagged by Google.Work your nicheFind smaller directories that cater to your niche. “If you have an interior design site and get listed on an interior design directory you could hold more value,” Siu says. SEO can be fickle when it comes to directories, but this tactic could help a more eclectic business get noticed.This can be especially helpful for new companies who do exclusively local business. DeMers suggests looking into local online directories like MerchantCircle and SuperPages, but adds that these won’t make sweeping changes to your search engine results. “Getting published in each local directory is beneficial mostly for local SEO and marginal for national SEO,” he says.last_img read more

Man who sexually assaulted sleeping men banned from London Underground

Man who sexually assaulted sleeping men banned from London Underground

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Encada was apprehended quickly after the second incident | Photo: BTP Fernando Enclada, 37, admitted to performing a sex act and making sexual comments to his victims at Blackfriars Crown Court.The first incident occurred during the early hours of the morning on 4 February last year (2017). He boarded on an eastbound Central Line train from Tottenham Court Road. At some point, the victim fell asleep and Enclada sat next to him.However, the victim woke up to find Enclada touching him inappropriately and making sexual comments.Then on 1 July 2017, another man traveled alone on the Central Line Night Tube at around 3.30am. After falling asleep, he woke up at Hainault to find Enclada performing a sexual act on him.He challenged Enclada, who fled the scene.Both men reported the incident to the policeBoth men were in their twenties.British Transport Police (BTP), dressed in plain-clothes, were able to arrest Enclada following several enquiries on 14 July 2017.Facing the charge of two counts of sexual assault, the court Enclada ordered to pay a £900 fine and sentenced him to nine months behind bars.The court ordered him to sign the Sexual Offenders Register for a period of ten years and a Sexual Harm Prevention order for a period of five years. Gay couple stabbed in neck, back and hand for holding hands in public Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…center_img A man has been banned from using the London Underground and other public transport after sexually assaulting two sleeping men. Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . This means Enclada is prohibited from using the London Underground, Overground, National Rail and DLR services between 1am and 7am. He also cannot travel within the TFL zone without using a registered Oystercard, Freedom Pass or Contactless Card.Banned from London UndergroundThe officer who investigated the case, Detective Constable Andy Parkinson, said: ‘[Enclada] exploited the vulnerabilities of two sleeping men and sexually assaulted them. His actions were abhorrent and disgraceful.‘Both victims in this case demonstrated great strength in reporting Enclada’s behavior.‘I’d personally like to thank them for their support, thanks to the overwhelming evidence against him, Enclada was forced to plea guilty.’More from Gay Star News:Gay twin models accuse top photographer Rick Day of sexual assault Trans woman sexually assaulted while sleeping at Cleveland homeless shelter‘Predatory rapist’ who targeted gay women in Manchester gets 20 years in jailElderly man charged for asking guy to ‘f**k’ him on Singapore trainRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/man-sexual-assault-sleeping-men-tube/last_img read more

VIDEO Clinical Use of the ViewRay MRIdian Linac System at Henry Ford

VIDEO Clinical Use of the ViewRay MRIdian Linac System at Henry Ford

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology View all 220 items Clinical Use of the ViewRay MRIdian Linac System at Henry FordVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:14Loaded: 2.66%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:14 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享center_img CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Videos | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | October 15, 2018 VIDEO: Clinical Use of the ViewRay MRIdian Linac System at Henry Ford Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Technology Reports View all 9 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute, describes the benefits the department has realized from using the first FDA-approved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy system to allow real-time treatment tracking.Watch the related VIDEO: MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy Trial for Pancreatic Cancer.Register to view a webinar on the ViewRay MRI-guided radiation therapy system.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more

Costa Rican Electricity Institute rules out blackouts in coming months

Costa Rican Electricity Institute rules out blackouts in coming months

first_imgRelated posts:Electricity rates to remain unchanged through December 2015 Electricity rates for ICE customers to increase in October Costa Rica’s industry sector leaders fed up with high electricity rates Regulatory agency drops electricity rates for all distributors in Costa Rica Although the National Meteorological Institute (IMN) confirmed adrop in rainfall levels for the current rainy season, the Costa Rica Electricity Institute (ICE) has ruled out power outages later this year.A lack of rainfall this season, which runs from May to November, is evident in most of the country. But ICE electricity manager Luis Pacheco said current reservoir levels remain stable and expected rainfall will be enough to keep the reserves filled for use in hydroelectric power generation for the rest of the year.Costa Rica uses up to 800 megawatt-hours daily, and of that amount, 80 percent is generated from renewable sources, such as hydroelectric and eolic (as of December 2012). The remaining 20 percent is generated by using hydrocarbon-powered plants, according to an ICE report published in April of this year. (Read that report in Spanish here: Plan_expansion_generacion.)According to the IMN, changes in precipitation patterns are caused by the El Niño weather phenomenon and affect most of the country. Currently the South Pacific is the only region with normal rainfall levels for the season, the agency said.In the North Pacific, the rainfall deficit this month is 60 percent. That percentage is expected to decrease slightly in August to 50 percent and in September to 40 percent, the IMN said.In the Central Valley, the rainfall deficit this month reached 30 percent and is expected to increase to 50 percent in September. The Central Pacific will see the lowest deficit, currently at 20 percent. IMN forecasts note it will drop to 15 percent in August and 5 percent in September.In contrast, El Niño is causing an unusual increase in precipitation in the Northern and Caribbean regions, where IMN recorded a rainfall increase of 20 percent. That’s likely to reach 30 percent in August.Heavy rains caused flooding in various cantons of the province of Limón last week, where 30 people were evacuated and several homes were affected. El Niño is expected to continue through April 2015, the IMN said.However, a recent increase in rainfall has allowed the Public Services Regulatory Agency on Wednesday to approve a 9 percent decrease in electricity rates for residents of the Northern Zone. Lower rates will take effect after they are published in the official newspaper La Gaceta. Facebook Commentslast_img read more