Walsh learns lessons from injuries, teammates

first_imgGREGORY DIXON/Herald PhotoWhen she first stepped onto the UW soccer fields in 2004, then-freshman Taylor Walsh didn’t know what to expect.She was coming to a team with outstanding forwards Marissa Brown, Kara Kabellis and Amy Vermeulen, and she didn’t know how she would fit into the scoring formula.Through her first three games of the 2004 season, however, it was Walsh who looked like the veteran, scoring three points. More importantly, Walsh and Vermeulen had developed a connection that could prove to be one that produced a plethora of goals for Wisconsin.However, Walsh’s good fortunes were about to take a turn for the worse.In her fourth game, Walsh sprained her ankle and was forced to leave the game. The next weekend, the trainers thought Walsh had developed mononucleosis and she had to sit for two games. When she was finally cleared to play in the seventh game of the year, Walsh tore the meniscus in her right knee and had to miss the remainder of the year. All in all, it wasn’t a good month for Walsh.”After I tore my meniscus, I was like, this is the worst season of my life,” Walsh said. “Looking back, it worked out because if I would have played that game, I wouldn’t have been able to take a red shirt. I couldn’t bear to stay home when they played, so I begged my dad to drive me to Illinois and Northwestern and my mom flew me to Ohio State. It was really difficult not being there.”Not only was the injury devastating for Walsh, but head coach Dean Duerst was equally disappointed to see Walsh’s fast start to the season ruined by an injury.”[As soon as she got here], Taylor clicked with Vermeulen,” Duerst said. “That’s why it was so exciting to see her start out so well and get on a roll, get confidence and score goals for us. [The injury] became a real challenge that you are now faced with the situation where you aren’t on the field. Adversity will challenge you in a certain way that you have to figure out what it is all about and learn from it.”When the women’s soccer team finished the season 16-6-1 in 2004 and lost to Notre Dame in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, it began one of the most important off-seasons for Walsh. Put through a rigorous training regimen in the off-season, Walsh got back on the field a year later with a fresh start and a stronger leg. The only problem was that Walsh’s mental edge was still on the mend. “I was over-thinking everything,” Walsh said. “I was thinking about what the coaches thought about me, what other players were thinking, how I was playing and every touch I made. My mind was racing all over the place and it was a bad situation. I played fine but I didn’t have a great season.”Walsh played in all 24 of the team’s games in 2005, starting 15, but never really could find the back of the net, scoring only three goals in her first year back. However, Walsh knew she still had the talent and the skills to play when she scored two goals against her in-state rival Wisconsin-Milwaukee. For Walsh, it was a nice welcome back gift.”It was one of the high points of my season,” Walsh said. “It was my welcome back party against a team that I really don’t like, because I know a lot of the girls on the team. I love them but it’s always a grudge match. It really helped my confidence.”Even though she struggled to regain her form, Walsh took refuge in having her two best friends playing soccer with her in Katy Meuer and Ann Eshun. These three were not only in the same recruiting class, but also went to three rival high schools in the Madison area (Meuer went to Madison Memorial, Eshun to Edgewood and Walsh to Madison East).It was at this level they developed a rapport with each other, although it wasn’t always friendly competition. “I met Taylor through (the Olympic Development Program) and all three of us played on the same club team,” Meuer said. “We always competed in practice and our club team was very competitive. I remember Taylor and Ann going against each other one-on-one all day on the field, and I think it helped all of our individual skills become better.””We had one of the best experiences playing club [soccer],” Walsh added. “Katy’s high school was a big rival of everyone in the Madison area and no one never really liked them. Katy is a feisty player in general who pushes you around a lot. That’s Katy though. Ann and I played against each other once, but it was fun since we won that game. … It wasn’t necessary friendly competition, but healthy since we needed to compete to get better.”Their friendship continued to develop when all three decided to attend UW and play soccer on the same team. “I was very excited. I thought it was really cool that we kind of knew each other already and now, I didn’t have to come in as this lone freshman not knowing anybody,” Meuer said. “Going to college together has made us a lot closer. We got to practice everyday together, travel together, see each other 24-7, going to library and movies together. We are really close with each other.””I love it [and] I think it’s exciting that you get to see your best friends everyday,” Walsh said.Through the first 11 games of this season, it seems like Walsh is back to her old self. She has tied her career high with three goals and has dished out three assists as Wisconsin boasts a 5-4-2 record overall. The key to Walsh’s early success this season could be in what she does before the game.”Taylor has a lot of crazy superstitions,” said junior goalie and former roommate Lynn Murray. “[She has to] straighten her hair before every game. She had a salad before the first three games this year and scored in all three. So now she has a salad before every game. Just crazy little things that just make her the player she is.”Putting her pre-game meals aside, what has made Walsh a complete player is that she has matured in all facets of her game, learning the skill and characteristics that go into playing the forward position. Plus, she has regained her mental edge, which she was sorely looking for after her injury.”Mentally, I am more focused and mature in my game this year than last year,” Walsh said. “Last year I was testing the waters to come back. This year, I am seeing things more, understanding my position, what the coaches and my teammates are looking for me to do. I am actually happy with [how I am playing] for once, which is saying a lot since I am so hard on myself.”last_img read more

Amendments to Mines Act increases time allocated for investigation

first_img“We don’t want to be in a position where time limits prevent investigators and Crown Counsel from doing their jobs, Minister of Energy and Mines, Bill Bennett said in a written statement. “These amendments will ensure there is more time available, if required, for a thorough investigation and for a decision on whether to pursue charges for offences under the Mines Act.”The amendment to the time limit for pursuing charges under the Mines Act is similar other natural resource legislation, such as the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Environmental Management Act, according to Minister BennettCurrently, under the Mines Act, the province has six months to one year to pursue charges for offences committed under the act, depending on the nature of the offence.- Advertisement -The amendment will increase this limit to three years from when the chief inspector of mines first learns of the incident.The amendments to the act will come into effect as of Aug. 1, 2014, and will apply to all ongoing investigations, including the tailings storage facility breach at Mount Polleylast_img read more

Coke to give schools safe water

first_imgThousands of youngsters will leadhealthier lives through the Waterfor Schools initiative.(Image: Coca-Cola) MEDIA CONTACTS • Sammy MohlaoliCoca-Cola SA snr communications manager+27 11 644 0528 or +27 79 525 6934RELATED ARTICLES• Fifa trophy on the home stretch• World Cup fever spreads abroad• SA pride in World Cup at 90%• BBC spends big bucks on SA studioJanine ErasmusGlobal beverage manufacturer Coca-Cola is involved in the 2010 Fifa World Cup in a big way with a number of initiatives that will leave a lasting impression on communities.More important than the tournament itself, the company is to leave a lasting legacy in South Africa by improving access to drinking water and sanitation facilities for school children around the country, as well as the areas in which they live.The project, known as Water for Schools, falls under the umbrella of the Coca-Cola Replenish Africa Initiative (Rain), a six-year programme launched in early 2009 to provide safe drinking water to thousands of communities across the continent.Coca-Cola is funding the initiative to the tune of US$30-million (R223-million).The quality of life of at least 2-million people is expected to improve, and the company too will reap benefits because, in the words of Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent, “our business needs strong, healthy communities to grow and be sustainable”.Kent added that the world’s biggest beverage company has made it a priority to help African communities tackle the day-to-day challenges facing them, especially in terms of access to safe water.Wise use of waterWater for Schools is due to roll out in 100 South African schools by the end of the year. As part of the project Coca-Cola is encouraging all South Africans to use water wisely and implementing customised water stewardship programmes at a community level.Whether the requirement is for better ablution facilities, new boreholes, or equipment to harvest rainwater, the company will fulfil the needs of an area once it has established what they are.“School water projects have been among the most effective approaches to improving young people’s lives, which has a positive multiplier effect across communities,” said William Asiko, president of The Coca-Cola Africa Foundation, which oversees the company’s social responsibility initiatives on the continent.The World Health Organisation (WHO) reported that more than 300-million Africans struggle to find potable water on a daily basis. Deadly waterborne diseases proliferate in unsafe water, killing thousands. The WHO estimated that at any time, half of the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa suffer from diseases related to poor sanitation and unclean drinking water.Furthermore, in the years leading up to 2015 – the target for implementation of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals (MDG) – an additional 47-million Africans will be added to the already long list of those without access to clean water. This means that the continent is not likely to meet the MDG deadline.World Cup trophy in SAAs a long-standing Fifa partner, Coca-Cola is also taking the World Cup trophy on a tour of the host country. By the time it arrives in Johannesburg on 5 May, Fifa and Coca-Cola will have taken it to 83 countries around the world, including every African nation.The trophy left Fifa headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, in September 2009 and is now on the last leg of its 139 000km global tour. The company has described the response by Africans in particular as “incredible”, and soon it will be South Africa’s turn, with excited fans in towns, cities, villages and townships around the country getting the chance to pose beside the solid gold bounty.For many, it will be the closest they get to the World Cup.“From 5 May we are going to go around the country, with the trophy, and invite South Africans to come out and join us in celebration,” said Coca-Cola South Africa’s marketing manager Zayd Abrahams. “They can sing with us; dance with us; and kick the ball with us.”From Pretoria the trophy travels down to the Western Cape, where the tour officially begins on 7 May. Making its way across the country, it will visit the Eastern Cape; KwaZulu-Natal; Free State; Northern Cape; North West; Mpumalanga; and Limpopo provinces before it heads for its final destination in Johannesburg, Gauteng.Download a PDF of the trophy’s global route (79KB).last_img read more

Future quantum technologies may exploit identical particle entanglement

Future quantum technologies may exploit identical particle entanglement

first_imgIllustration of entanglement between two identical particles with overlapping wave functions. Credit: Lo Franco and Compagno. ©2018 American Physical Society Explore further © 2018 Phys.org Citation: Future quantum technologies may exploit identical particle entanglement (2018, June 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-future-quantum-technologies-exploit-identical.html Journal information: Physical Review Letters Usually when physicists perform quantum entanglement between particles—whether it be qubits, atoms, photons, electrons, etc.—the particles are distinguishable in some way. Only recently have physicists demonstrated the feasibility of generating entanglement between particles that are completely identical. Interestingly, this entanglement exists just because of the indistinguishability of the particles, without any interaction between them.center_img More information: Rosario Lo Franco and Giuseppe Compagno. “Indistinguishability of elementary systems as resource for quantum information processing.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.240403, Also at arXiv:1712.00706 [quant-ph] Now in a new paper, physicists have gone a step further, showing that the entanglement between identical particles can be harnessed and potentially used for quantum applications.The physicists, Rosario Lo Franco and Giuseppe Compagno at the University of Palermo, Italy, have published a paper in which they show the usefulness of identical particle entanglement in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.As the physicists explain, in order for two independently prepared, identical particles to be entangled, they must share a region of space in close physical proximity—more technically, the particles’ wave functions must spatially overlap, at least partially. If there is no spatial overlap, then there is no entanglement. If there is partial spatial overlap, and measurements are made within the overlap region, then there is conditional entanglement with a certain probability. Only when the wave functions exhibit complete spatial overlap is there always entanglement, though the amount of entanglement depends on both the measurement and the shape of the wave functions.The main result of the new study is that the physicists developed a procedure to directly extract the entanglement that occurs when the wave functions completely overlap, and then use this entanglement as a resource for various applications. To do this, they extended the concept of LOCC (local operations and classical communication), which is typically used to quantify the entanglement between distinguishable particles, to indistinguishable ones. This required defining spatial LOCC, or sLOCC, operations, which makes it possible to quantify the exploitable entanglement contained in a state of independently prepared identical particles and use it—for example, for a teleportation protocol. “Our study indicates that a basic entangling mechanism can be realized by simply bringing independent identical particles to spatially overlap and accessing the entanglement by sLOCC operations,” Lo Franco told Phys.org. “This operational approach is what is desirable for experiments.” The physicists expect that it should be possible to experimentally carry out the new procedure using straightforward methods. “For instance, a simple implementation may be obtained by a modified Hanbury Brown and Twiss photonic setup with orthogonal polarizers placed before detection,” said Compagno.In the future, this new kind of entanglement could have applications in areas ranging from quantum networks to Bell experiments, among other uses. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Physicists settle controversy over identical particle entanglementlast_img read more

Defender Mondal battles personal tragedy poverty to earn PKL success

Defender Mondal battles personal tragedy poverty to earn PKL success

first_imgNew Delhi: Hailing from a region known for its love and passion for football, Bengal Warriors defender Amaresh Mondal took a slightly different path. Currently warming the bench in his second season of the cash-rich Pro Kabaddi League (PKL), Mondal, like most children in his native West Bengal, initially started out as a footballer before switching sports. Forced to battle hardship and tragedy since childhood, it is perhaps fitting that Mondal chose to play kabaddi, a physically demanding sport that requires loads of physical and mental toughness from its adherents. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life Hailing from a village near Bongaon, a small rural town around 80 kilometres from Kolkata, the 22-year-old suffered his first tragedy early in life when both his parents passed away when he was still a baby. With the cost of a football kit out of his reach, Mondal was forced to shelve his ambitions of becoming a footballer and switched to kabaddi. “Everyone else played football, but it was difficult for me to afford the costly kits, I had no money. Kabaddi doesn’t require any such stuff which pulled me towards the sport. When I was in 10th standard, my school coach also asked me to give it a try and that is what I did. I focused completely on kabaddi and had made my mind to play in PKL one day,” Mondal told IANS in an interview. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed After playing the game for nearly four years in district- and village-level tournaments, Mondal’s journey took a step forward after a Kolkata-based kabaddi club recruited him. “I had to travel four to five hours to reach Kolkata for training and it was usually around one or two in the night when I returned. Despite these struggles, I had made my mind to feature in the PKL,” the defender said. Mondal’s skills were later noticed by PKL officials who were appointed to bring grassroots talent from different part of the the country for the New Young Players (NYP) programme. “After passing various levels, I entered the final selection camps held in Gandhinagar and later in Mumbai before being finally selected by the Bengal Warriors,” Mondal said, adding: “I feel great representing my own state-based kabaddi franchise.” Describing his reaction on being selected for the Warriors, he said: “I didn’t knew how to react, whether to smile or cry. I was amazed; it took me more than hour to utter a word.” The defender is, however, the only Bengali player in the squad but Mondal doesn’t find any problem with that. “It doesn’t make much difference as our skipper Surjeet Singh, coach Jagdish Kumble and other team members are very supportive. Being a junior, they make me learn from my mistakes,” Mondal said. Asked about the changes in his life after entering the biggest arena of the game, he said: “Pro Kabaddi has changed my life completely. When I first came here, I used to be very thin — but now look how I am. I get quality and healthy food beside high-level training here, which I lacked in my home.” About his next target, Mondal said: “I want to represent the national team and if I get any government job, it would be very nice.last_img read more

Ensemble heading to Grand Hyatt Baha Mar for 2018

Ensemble heading to Grand Hyatt Baha Mar for 2018

center_img Friday, October 20, 2017 Tags: Ensemble Travel Group DALLAS — Ensemble Travel Group’s 50th anniversary celebration and annual conference will take place at Grand Hyatt Baha Mar in Nassau, marking the organization’s first annual conference to take place outside North America in more than 10 years.The dates for the conference are Oct. 23 – 27, 2018.“It takes a very special venue to host Ensemble’s 50th anniversary next October, and we feel Baha Mar and its Grand Hyatt Baha Mar property will deliver all the wows that this celebration deserves,” said Libbie Rice, Co-President, Ensemble Travel Group. “Work has already begun on the conference program, speaker lineup, and some pre- and post-options to make sure our members and partners get the most out of this major milestone in the evolution of Ensemble Travel Group.”Ensemble just wrapped up its 2017 conference, which took place at the Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion.The agency group’s 2018 Ensemble Elite celebration is scheduled for June 3 – 9, 2018 at Club Med Marrakech La Palmeraie in Morocco. The annual event recognizes the organization’s top-producing members in Canada and the U.S. and will feature a number of customized sightseeing activities, private dinners and receptions.last_img read more