A’s taking a patient approach with Trivino’s wounded thumb

first_imgA chair will be reserved for Lou Trivino at the end of the A’s bullpen. There’s just no chance the A’s hard-throwing backend reliever will be up from that chair during Wednesday’s series finale against the Texas Rangers.Trivino is still recovering from an injury on his pitching hand incurred when a ball, lost in the sun’s glare, fell and hit the top of his thumb. Trivino is wearing a protective covering, but manager Bob Melvin doesn’t anticipate a trip to the injured list.“If we felt like it …last_img read more

USDA Opens ARC-PLC Enrollment

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorOMAHA (DTN) — USDA has opened enrollment for the main commodity programs in the farm bill, the Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage programs.Enrollment is open for the 2019 crop year and farmers have until March 15, 2020, to sign up for the programs for 2019.Under the 2018 farm bill, farmers can sign up their individual crops in ARC-County or PLC, or sign up the entire farm in ARC-Individual. Those program elections will apply for the 2019 and 2020 crop years.ARC and PLC have been largely on the backburner over the past year while USDA has been providing farmers with trade-aid support under the Market Facilitation Program. MFP, which began last year, was initially expected to be a one-time program, but USDA reopened the program for 2019 after trade talks with China stalled last spring.ARC operates on a rolling average of revenue price guarantees for crops based on average county yields. PLC has set reference prices for commodities and pays when the national marketing year price comes in below those reference prices.While enrollment began officially on Tuesday for the 2019 crop year, farmers can enroll for the 2020 crop year starting Oct. 7 and continuing until June 30, 2020. USDA noted a farmer waiting until Oct. 7 for sign up can enroll in both the 2019 and 2020 crop years during the same visit.Farmers get one chance to update their yields for the 2020 crop year. Under the farm bill provisions, farmers will be able to update yield data for each commodity up to 90% of the average yield for the farm from the 2013-17 crop years.“During this time, farm owners have a one-time opportunity to update PLC payment yields that takes effect beginning with crop year 2020. If the owner accompanies the producer to the office, the yield update may be completed during the same office visit,” USDA stated.Farmers will have the opportunity from 2021 through 2023 to change their program decisions.Under the 2014 farm bill, payments for ARC declined over time for major crops as prices fell after the 2013 crop year. Payments for PLC, which were low at the beginning of the farm bill, increased during the latter part of the farm bill. Congress then added the option for the 2018 farm bill for farmers to switch programs if they wish to do so.Congress also changed the program by using yields reported by crop insurance companies to the Risk Management Agency for ARC and PLC.In another program change, if prices move higher over the next few years, then the reference price for ARC and PLC can increase as well. Reference prices have changed to use a five-year Olympic average of prices that would allow reference prices to increase as much as 15% for commodity crops. The current reference prices for corn ($3. 70 a bushel), soybeans ($8.40) and wheat, ($5.50) and reference prices for other commodities remain the same as the 2014 farm bill.The 2018 farm bill made some other changes to the ARC program, including a trend-yield adjustment and a provision that allows USDA to divide some of the largest counties in the country into smaller units for county average yields.USDA reminds farmers that enrolling in ARC and PLC can affect eligibility for the Supplemental Coverage Option insurance program. Farmers who sign up for ARC are ineligible for SCO on those planted acres, but farmers who enroll in PLC can still buy SCO policies.Upland cotton farmers who enroll their seed cotton base acres in ARC or PLC also are ineligible for the Stacked Income Protection Plan (STAX) on those cotton acres. To remain eligible for STAX, producers must not enroll their seed cotton base acres into either ARC or PLC.To help farmers decide the best program for their acres, USDA has partnered with the University of Illinois and Texas A&M University for a pair of web-based tools.University of Illinois: https://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/…Texas A&M University: https://www.afpc.tamu.edu/…Chris Clayton can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(BAS/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Instagram Now Lets Users—and Marketers—Post Canned Video

first_imgInstagram announced in a blog post today that its 4.1 version will include a feature that lets you upload 15-second videos to the mobile app. Up to now, Instagram and Vine users could only upload videos captured in the moment—nothing that had been shot previously and saved. This could be a big bonus for marketers—and for Facebook, which clearly wants to use Instagram video to soften up users for eventual short commercial video in their News Feeds.See also: Instagram Videos Could Spell A Billion Dollars Worth Of Magic For FacebookWith Instagram’s new feature, users can import any 15 seconds of video from their media library. As with photos, Instagram will also let users square-crop their footage to keep in line with that perfect Instagram uniformity.Image courtesy of Instagram  The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#Import#Instagram#video Related Posts center_img readwrite What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

Audi says they’ll hit Level 3 autonomy on the A8 by 2019

first_imgDavid Curry Related Posts 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Tags:#Audi A8#Autonomous#driver assistance#driverless#Internet of Things#IoT#Self-Driving IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A…center_img Audi has unveiled the late 2017 update to the A8, the company’s largest saloon car, which will be the first car sold with a Level 3 autonomous system onboard.In a press release, Audi claims that other vendors are selling Level 2 cars, which force drivers to remain focused on the road. The A8 differs in that respect, once drivers activate the self-driving system, they are allowed to take their eyes off the road.See also: Audi and NVIDIA commit to driverlessness by 2020The system will only work on highways when there is traffic, as Audi decides when the driver is allowed to press the button and the max speed is 60 kph (37 mph).To get the driver back in control, Audi deploys a variety of noises, lights, and vibrations. Visual and audio cues are the first warning, followed by tightening the seatbelt and hitting the brakes. If that fails to draw the attention of the driver, the system will turn on flashers and stop.A stepping stone to level 5Audi wants the A8 to be a stepping stone towards full autonomy, which is still a long way off. Even with the compromises on speed, however, the A8 will not be allowed to drive on any roads in Germany, China or the United Kingdom at the present time.Most countries are still against anything that allows the driver to take their attention off the road. Audi would need to receive approval for the car before selling it with the autonomous system, and even then it might be forced to add additional safety protocols.The carmaker expects the system to be available in Germany by 2019 and has not given an estimate for other countries. By that time, some suspect, we will have driverless taxis and shuttles on the road, which might make the compromise system look a bit outdated. For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and…last_img read more

Shore Club development starts in January 2014

Shore Club development starts in January 2014

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppShore Club development in the Turks and Caicos gets the support of the Turks and Caicos Cabinet to extend its development agreement; the notion put officially to the governor to consider for the project which was stalled in the economic slow-down. The Hartling Group of the TCI & Decco Ltd of Cayman Islands wants to create 38 luxury suites and villas in Long Bay Hills and revealed that the real estate investment is valued at 100 million dollars, with 60% of the units already sold. The Premier of the Turks and Caicos, Hon Rufus Ewing recently revealing that construction on the Shore Club begins in January.last_img read more