Brazilian Military Renowned for Jungle Warfare Training

first_imgThe training unfolds in three phases, which are known as Jungle Life, Special Techniques, and Jungle Operations. Conducted at six of the seven bases scattered throughout a closed jungle area measuring 1,152 km² with a 95 percent preservation rate, the course takes place in a region known as the “Cursed Square” in Manaus, capital city of the State of Amazonas. If legions of foreign troops were to invade Brazil and attempt to occupy the rivers and villages of the Amazon, warriors trained in jungle combat would silently advance upon the enemy, using the jungle as their ally. At nightfall, the warriors would attack the enemy’s main bases and then return to the depths of the jungle, while the invading force would never even know that the local jungle experts were waiting for them all along. CIGS trains jungle warriors for irregular combat, rather than defending a fixed point, as most conventional Military units would do. For instance, trainees are taught to impede enemy Soldiers by using booby traps and launching furtive attacks. CIGS warriors learn how to use their knowledge of the jungle and technological tools, such as communications equipment, to prevail in jungle combat. For students, completing the program and earning the Seal of the Jaguar and the Jungle Warrior’s Saber is difficult. The course is intense and teaches service members how to obtain from the things they need from the jungle to survive and fight successfully. “The Army was very happy with the choice of Maj. Teixeira as the first commander. He served in the Parachutist Division Core, he was deployed abroad, and when he returned, he created CIGS out of nothing,” said Colonel Nilton Correa Lampert, the 11th commander, who was a student for the first CIGS course. The school is currently located in the same area where the accident occurred. Two years after its establishment by presidential decree, CIGS conducted its first training course, with a class for officers and another one for Army sergeants major and other sergeants. Then-Artillery Major Jorge Teixeira de Oliveira, known as Teixeirão, was the CIGS’s first commander and became the school’s patron. “Once in Brazil, I learned the majority of the officers attending trained for well over six months in order to be ready for the course,” said Alejandro. “[The course] is very physically demanding, and not being used to the weather [average temperature 90 degrees and 80 percent humidity) could determine whether you made it through the first week of training.” Training for jungle combat CIGS trains jungle warriors for irregular combat, rather than defending a fixed point, as most conventional Military units would do. For instance, trainees are taught to impede enemy Soldiers by using booby traps and launching furtive attacks. CIGS warriors learn how to use their knowledge of the jungle and technological tools, such as communications equipment, to prevail in jungle combat. CIGS conducts two 12-week training sessions a year offering seven different categories of jungle operations courses. “CIGS is a fundamental tool for military training for the largest and most unusual jungle biosphere in the world,” said Major Marcus Vinícius, CIGS Jungle Operations Chief. “The candidates for this training course are subjected to regular medical exams, physical, and cognitive tests.” In the jungle, a single mistake by an enemy Soldier sets off an ambush by the jungle warriors, who attack with machine guns as well as by dropping logs on their adversaries’ heads from tree branches above. In the second phase, during the second, third, and fourth weeks, students learn topography, how to install and operate communications antennae, the use of explosives, how to launch ambushes, and how to conduct operations using helicopters and ships. During this phase, students spend a lot of time on the firing range, where they use nearly 1,000 cartridges of ammunition. “[In all training phases, the students] wake up at 0450 and receive Military physical training at 0500. Students have breakfast at 0600, attend class from 0700 to 1150, have lunch at noon, attend more classes from 1300 to 1750 and have dinner at 1800,” said Maj. Vinícius. “Finally, students attend their last classes from 1900 to 2250 and then have supper, complete a sanitation inspection (personal hygiene), and perform weapons maintenance at 2300. They go to sleep at midnight. This routine is repeated for 10 weeks.” By Dialogo February 11, 2015 In addition to the Army, other service members also participate in the course, from the Navy, Air Force, auxiliary forces (Military Police and Firefighters), and military officers from 28 partner nations, including United States Special Operations Forces. In the jungle, a single mistake by an enemy Soldier sets off an ambush by the jungle warriors, who attack with machine guns as well as by dropping logs on their adversaries’ heads from tree branches above. The Special Operations Command site highlighted that Alejandro’s opportunity to train next to Brazilian counterparts had been valuable in expanding an important relationship between the Brazilian Armed Forces and the U.S. Military. In addition to the Army, other service members also participate in the course, from the Navy, Air Force, auxiliary forces (Military Police and Firefighters), and military officers from 28 partner nations, including United States Special Operations Forces. The school is currently located in the same area where the accident occurred. Two years after its establishment by presidential decree, CIGS conducted its first training course, with a class for officers and another one for Army sergeants major and other sergeants. Then-Artillery Major Jorge Teixeira de Oliveira, known as Teixeirão, was the CIGS’s first commander and became the school’s patron. Training for jungle combat The Brazilian Military created the CIGS in 1964 after considering they lacked in having an operational unit capable of utilizing Brazil’s thick Amazon jungle to their benefit. Since then jungle warfare training conducted by CIGS is widely considered to be the best in the world. U.S. Special Operations Warrant Officer Javier Alejandro, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, graduated from the demanding course in 2009. Since the first class graduated in 1966, a total of 5,766 students have completed the program successfully, including the 2014 graduates, according to information from the center. The origin of the expression, “Jungle!” The training, an intensive and physically and mentally challenging period, concludes with a non-war operation in the municipalities of Tabatinga and São Gabriel da Cachoeira, in the State of Amazonas; and Boa Vista, in the State of Roraima. “Until the mid-1960s, the Brazilian Army did not have Troops or service members specializing in jungle combat,” Maj. Vinícius said. “This fact was made clear by the enormous difficulties encountered in recovering the bodies of victims of an airplane accident involving a Panair Brasil Constellation flight in 1962. Fifty people died, and the operation took over a week.” The Special Operations Command site highlighted that Alejandro’s opportunity to train next to Brazilian counterparts had been valuable in expanding an important relationship between the Brazilian Armed Forces and the U.S. Military. The Brazilian Military created the CIGS in 1964 after considering they lacked in having an operational unit capable of utilizing Brazil’s thick Amazon jungle to their benefit. Since then jungle warfare training conducted by CIGS is widely considered to be the best in the world. The selection process is rigorous and divides the students into two 50-student shifts commanded by 40 instructors – 20 officers and 20 sergeants. If legions of foreign troops were to invade Brazil and attempt to occupy the rivers and villages of the Amazon, warriors trained in jungle combat would silently advance upon the enemy, using the jungle as their ally. At nightfall, the warriors would attack the enemy’s main bases and then return to the depths of the jungle, while the invading force would never even know that the local jungle experts were waiting for them all along. After passing the first two phases, students complete a series of missions during weeks five through 10 of the program, during which they use all they have learned up to that point. For students, completing the program and earning the Seal of the Jaguar and the Jungle Warrior’s Saber is difficult. The course is intense and teaches service members how to obtain from the things they need from the jungle to survive and fight successfully. Conducted at six of the seven bases scattered throughout a closed jungle area measuring 1,152 km² with a 95 percent preservation rate, the course takes place in a region known as the “Cursed Square” in Manaus, capital city of the State of Amazonas. In 1969, CIGS was divided into three initial categories: A ( for senior officers), B (for captains and lieutenants), and C (for sergeants major and other sergeants). But, in 2010, it was further divided into categories D (for sergeants major and sergeants first class), E (for medical officers), F (for medical sergeants major and other sergeants) and G (for cadets). U.S. Special Operations Warrant Officer Javier Alejandro, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, graduated from the demanding course in 2009. In total, 26 countries’ military forces have taken part in the Jungle Warfare course, with a total of 444 international graduates, according to a report by Brazilian website G1.Globo.com. Of those, 15 are neighboring countries in the Americas, including Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the United States, and Uruguay. CIGS conducts two 12-week training sessions a year offering seven different categories of jungle operations courses. “Amazônia Legal is a region that covers more than half of Brazil’s territory, with approximately 12,000 km of the land border and 1,000 km of the coast,” Colonel Alfredo José Ferreira Dias, commander of the CIGS, told the Brazilian Army’s Verde-Oliva magazine in its October 2014 edition. “All of this, from a Military point of view, underscores the importance of CIGS, whose primary mission is to train Special Forces in jungle warfare, while also conducting doctrinal research and experiments to defend and protect the Amazon and Brazil.” The training, an intensive and physically and mentally challenging period, concludes with a non-war operation in the municipalities of Tabatinga and São Gabriel da Cachoeira, in the State of Amazonas; and Boa Vista, in the State of Roraima. This scenario is an example of how jungle warriors, who are Military service members trained by the Brazilian Army’s Jungle Warfare Training Center (CIGS), could respond to an invasion. Physical challenges The surviving invaders might try to request back-up, but the thick jungle brush prevents any radio communication. And if they try to flee, they would be stopped by the poison darts fired on them by indigenous Soldiers on trees. The surviving invaders might try to request back-up, but the thick jungle brush prevents any radio communication. And if they try to flee, they would be stopped by the poison darts fired on them by indigenous Soldiers on trees. Selected for his fluency in Portuguese, the experienced Green Beret was privileged and honored to be nominated to the course, according to U.S. Special Operations website news.soc.mil. After passing the first two phases, students complete a series of missions during weeks five through 10 of the program, during which they use all they have learned up to that point. “Amazônia Legal is a region that covers more than half of Brazil’s territory, with approximately 12,000 km of the land border and 1,000 km of the coast,” Colonel Alfredo José Ferreira Dias, commander of the CIGS, told the Brazilian Army’s Verde-Oliva magazine in its October 2014 edition. “All of this, from a Military point of view, underscores the importance of CIGS, whose primary mission is to train Special Forces in jungle warfare, while also conducting doctrinal research and experiments to defend and protect the Amazon and Brazil.” “CIGS is a fundamental tool for military training for the largest and most unusual jungle biosphere in the world,” said Major Marcus Vinícius, CIGS Jungle Operations Chief. “The candidates for this training course are subjected to regular medical exams, physical, and cognitive tests.” “Once in Brazil, I learned the majority of the officers attending trained for well over six months in order to be ready for the course,” said Alejandro. “[The course] is very physically demanding, and not being used to the weather [average temperature 90 degrees and 80 percent humidity) could determine whether you made it through the first week of training.” The selection process is rigorous and divides the students into two 50-student shifts commanded by 40 instructors – 20 officers and 20 sergeants. Preparing students for jungle combat is important, considering the large amount of forest land in the country. Selected for his fluency in Portuguese, the experienced Green Beret was privileged and honored to be nominated to the course, according to U.S. Special Operations website news.soc.mil. This scenario is an example of how jungle warriors, who are Military service members trained by the Brazilian Army’s Jungle Warfare Training Center (CIGS), could respond to an invasion. Since the first class graduated in 1966, a total of 5,766 students have completed the program successfully, including the 2014 graduates, according to information from the center. Preparing students for jungle combat is important, considering the large amount of forest land in the country. Students also must prove their physical aptitude by swimming and crossing a portion of the Rio Negro while carrying a backpack, a rifle, and other equipment. Maj. Teixeira created the expression “Jungle!” (Selva) which is used by Army Soldiers throughout the Amazon. It is used both as a greeting and as a warning. “The Army was very happy with the choice of Maj. Teixeira as the first commander. He served in the Parachutist Division Core, he was deployed abroad, and when he returned, he created CIGS out of nothing,” said Colonel Nilton Correa Lampert, the 11th commander, who was a student for the first CIGS course. “[In all training phases, the students] wake up at 0450 and receive Military physical training at 0500. Students have breakfast at 0600, attend class from 0700 to 1150, have lunch at noon, attend more classes from 1300 to 1750 and have dinner at 1800,” said Maj. Vinícius. “Finally, students attend their last classes from 1900 to 2250 and then have supper, complete a sanitation inspection (personal hygiene), and perform weapons maintenance at 2300. They go to sleep at midnight. This routine is repeated for 10 weeks.” The training unfolds in three phases, which are known as Jungle Life, Special Techniques, and Jungle Operations. The first phase, which takes place during the first week of the program, is considered to be the most challenging. Students learn to become psychologically stronger, avoid tropical diseases, and find food and water in the jungle. Students also learn to identify dangerous plants and animals and receive physical military training. The origin of the expression, “Jungle!” The CIGS has a rich and colorful history. “Until the mid-1960s, the Brazilian Army did not have Troops or service members specializing in jungle combat,” Maj. Vinícius said. “This fact was made clear by the enormous difficulties encountered in recovering the bodies of victims of an airplane accident involving a Panair Brasil Constellation flight in 1962. Fifty people died, and the operation took over a week.” In the second phase, during the second, third, and fourth weeks, students learn topography, how to install and operate communications antennae, the use of explosives, how to launch ambushes, and how to conduct operations using helicopters and ships. During this phase, students spend a lot of time on the firing range, where they use nearly 1,000 cartridges of ammunition. The program is limited to 100 candidates per training session, of whom about 80 percent complete the course, while about 10 percent withdraw, according to CIGS. Students also must prove their physical aptitude by swimming and crossing a portion of the Rio Negro while carrying a backpack, a rifle, and other equipment. Maj. Teixeira created the expression “Jungle!” (Selva) which is used by Army Soldiers throughout the Amazon. It is used both as a greeting and as a warning. Physical challenges In 1969, CIGS was divided into three initial categories: A ( for senior officers), B (for captains and lieutenants), and C (for sergeants major and other sergeants). But, in 2010, it was further divided into categories D (for sergeants major and sergeants first class), E (for medical officers), F (for medical sergeants major and other sergeants) and G (for cadets). The first phase, which takes place during the first week of the program, is considered to be the most challenging. Students learn to become psychologically stronger, avoid tropical diseases, and find food and water in the jungle. Students also learn to identify dangerous plants and animals and receive physical military training. The program is limited to 100 candidates per training session, of whom about 80 percent complete the course, while about 10 percent withdraw, according to CIGS. The CIGS has a rich and colorful history. In total, 26 countries’ military forces have taken part in the Jungle Warfare course, with a total of 444 international graduates, according to a report by Brazilian website G1.Globo.com. Of those, 15 are neighboring countries in the Americas, including Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the United States, and Uruguay. Very nice page. I like it a lot. I was a servicemember and did this course in ’81. There’s nothing like it. There’s no use being well prepared. Incidents occur, so the military needs to drop the course, which to me, is something unrealistic. It was a huge drain on my son, who lost 10kg in only 15 days. He was well prepared and injured his knee. He had to drop out of the course, and he was second in his class! I AM AN ARGENTINE POLICEMAN AND I HAD THE HONOR OF SERVING WITH MEN FROM THE POLICE FORCE WHO TOOK THE COURSE… THEY RECEIVED THE BEST OF MEMORIES AND GREAT INSTRUCTION IN THIS COURSE…I WOULD GIVE EVERYTHING TO GO TO THIS COURSE…IF THE PERSON IN CHARGE WOULD ALLOW IT…JUNGLE!!!!! Good evening. My son is doing the Class of 2015 course on war in the jungle. Are there any readers on this page who also have a relative doing this course? I am anxious about doing this course to prepare for the worst. SELVA is more than just a course. It transforms man into a true warrior. For those who say that Brazil is on the little weak side, well the truth is that we are simply the world’s best jungle fighters, not to mention our commandos, who are one of the most lethal, elite groups in the world. I would like to take this course. As someone who was there during the early days of CIGS, I had the honor of serving jazz to Teixeirão and Tamaturgo and their legacies and our EB’s honorable chief and I don’t know if Gen. Bueno is still alive and I served with him here in the QG Army urban military sector and congratulations for this work and the CIGS is a brilliant school. Selva… Which war did you fight ?last_img read more

Wakerley remains a popular choice for families

first_imgA putting green at 13 Cliff Close, Wakerley was one of the property’s selling points.WAKERLEY’S reputation as a destination of choice for young families continues with the sale of 13 Cliff Close.The four-bedroom house, which had been on the market since September, sold for $765,000 during the first week of the new school year to a young family. FOLLOW THE COURIER-MAIL REAL ESTATE TEAM ON FACEBOOK ABS Census data shows 10.5 per cent of the population is aged from 5-9 years, compared with 6.9 per cent for Queensland.“The properties are conducive to families, and generally there’s a lot of parkland and reasonable-sized blocks,” he said.“With this house, it was a little unusual in layout and it backed onto bushland.”The property included a putting green, inground pool, an office and media room. Integrated bushland and parkland are making Wakerley popular with families. David Whyte of McGrath Bayside Manly said two local owner occupiers and one investor offered for the lowset house.He said the reputation of the local school had a lot to do with the area’s popularity.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020center_img SEE WHAT ELSE IS FOR SALE IN WAKERLEY A relaxed outdoor entertaining area gives families an extra place to hang out at home.The main living areas separated the master bedroom from the three other bedrooms.Wakerley’s median house price is $757,500, a 2.4 per cent increase in 12 months, with 144 houses selling, CoreLogic property data released this month shows.last_img read more

Lamberies now two for two at Shawano

first_imgLucas Lamberies repeated his winning ways in Saturday’s Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod main event at Shawano Speedway.By Scott OwenSHAWANO, Wis. (May 12) – Lucas Lamberies hustled back from Iowa to race Saturday night at Shawano Speedway.  It proved to be a good move for the Clintonville teenager as he won his second Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature in a row to start the season.Kyle Raddant and then Jordan Barkholtz held the early lead.  By lap eight Lamberies moved to second on the track. On lap 13, Barkholtz got high in turn two and brushed the outside wall.  That was the opening Lamberies needed as he stormed past Barkholtz to take the top spot.Lamberies led the rest of the way for his second win in a row.  Barkholtz held on for second, followed by Jordan Bartz, Todd Wiese, and Raddant.Mike Mullen was the IMCA Modified winner and Travis Van Straten paced the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car main.last_img read more

Griezmann!

first_imgGriezmann fires Atletico Madrid to Europa League titleLyon, France | AFP | Antoine Griezmann was the hero for Atletico Madrid as the French striker scored twice in their 3-0 win over Marseille in Wednesday’s Europa League final, allowing his club to win the trophy for the third time in nine seasons.It is Griezmann’s first major title as an Atletico player, and a fitting way to bow out if he leaves at the season’s end, with Barcelona tipped as his next destination.Griezmann — brought up in Macon, just 70 kilometres from Lyon — scored once in each half, his lethal finishes coming either side of Marseille losing Dimitri Payet to injury, the French side’s captain coming off in tears.He now has 29 goals for the season, although it was Gabi’s late strike that put the seal on the victory.Marseille had been desperate to win the second European trophy in their history, on French soil, 25 years after beating AC Milan in the inaugural Champions League final in Munich.But it was a flat night for their huge support, who threatened to ruin the occasion by constantly lighting flares and setting off firecrackers at one end of the stadium, with some even being thrown onto the pitch towards the end.The game carried on regardless, with Rudi Garcia’s side well beaten by Diego Simeone’s Atletico.Their triumph comes after their agonising defeats to city rivals Real Madrid in the Champions League finals of 2014 and 2016. They had previously won the Europa League in 2010 and again in 2012, the latter coming just six months after Simeone’s appointment.Simeone served a touchline ban here, meaning assistant German ‘Mono’ Burgos nominally took charge, but that did not perturb them on the field. Having fallen into this competition by virtue of a shock group-stage exit from the Champions League, Atletico were the favourites against a Marseille side whose continental campaign had begun in the the third qualifying round last July.– Marseille’s regrets –Just being in this final, their 19th European game of the season, was an achievement for Garcia’s team. But they will look back on the evening with regrets.After all, they had started well and had a great chance to open the scoring inside four minutes, Valere Germain shooting over from an excellent position after being slipped in by Payet.It was the kind of chance that does not come up often against an Atletico side who had kept 33 clean sheets in all competitions this season before this game.Having been on top, Marseille were then punished for sloppy defending as they fell behind in the 21st minute.Goalkeeper Steve Mandanda opted to play a pass to Andre-Frank Zambo Anguissa, deep in midfield, rather than clear long. The Cameroonian’s attempt at a touch was awful, and Gabi pounced on the loose ball, sending Griezmann through to finish.That subdued the massed ranks of Marseille fans, and things got worse for them when Payet, their captain and most influential player who had been struggling with a hamstring problem ahead of the game, came off crying just after the half-hour mark.OM needed to take the game to Atletico in the second half, but instead they conceded again just four minutes after the restart.It was a glorious goal, Griezmann finding Koke and then latching onto the return ball as he stormed into the box before lifting a deft finish over Mandanda and in.Substitute Kostas Mitroglou nearly set up a grandstand finale, his header coming off Jan Oblak’s post, before Gabi’s low drive in the 89th minute made it 3-0.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Florida Senators Seek to Form COVID-19 Testing Task Force

first_imgThree Florida lawmakers are asking Gov. Ron DeSantis to form a statewide task force in order to support COVID-19 testing and contact tracing, as well as supported isolation.“After a week of more than 1,000 new coronavirus cases a day, it’s abundantly clear Florida needs a centralized planning and implementation structure to suppress further outbreaks,” says Democratic Sen. Lori Berman, of Boynton Beach.Berman, along with Sen. Janet Cruz and Victor Torres, sent the letter requesting a task force earlier this week.“We created a task force to re-open our state – let’s create one to keep it open,” Berman explains.The Governor’s office has not yet responded to the request. According to the letter, members of the task force would potentially include the State Surgeon General, Emergency Management Director, County Health Department officials, business leaders with manufacturing capacity, and other political appointees.Health experts in the state say the key to identifying and containing coronavirus outbreaks is to expand testing and contact tracing.Florida’s number of contact tracers is currently below national guidelines.Sen. Berman applauded the efforts to test in Palm Beach County, but says there needs to be a more cohesive, coordinated, statewide response to the virus going forward.“Not every county has the robust testing we have,” she adds, “and it should be all coordinated. It shouldn’t be as much of a patch work as it is right now.”last_img read more

Champions selected for England senior campaign

first_img Three champions are among the players selected for the England senior men’s campaign for international team honours. Surrey’s Ian Attoe, the English senior champion, and Kent’s Richard Partridge, the Scottish and Irish titleholder, will represent England in the European senior men’s team championship at Pravets, Bulgaria, from 1-5 September. They’ll be joined in the team by Stephen East of Yorkshire, Alan Mew of Hampshire, David Niven of Berkshire, and Mark Stones of Essex. All six players, together with double European senior champion, Clive Jones, have also been selected for the Senior Men’s Home Internationals. The championship will be played on home ground at Crowborough Beacon in Sussex from 15-17 September. The England team has twice won the European title, in 2009 and 2010, and has had six Home International successes, most recently in 2012 and ’13. The players: Ian Attoe (Worplesdon) won the English senior championship at his home club and was also runner-up in the Scottish seniors and has had top ten finishes in the Welsh and Irish events. (Image © Leaderboard Photography) Stephen East (Moortown) topped the 2014 England senior order of merit at the end of his first senior season. He has followed this year up by winning the Portuguese title and tying second in the European seniors. He was also third in the English mid-amateur. Clive Jones (Toulouse), who is based in France, has won the European senior championship in both 2014 and 2015 Alan Mew (Stoneham) was third in the Welsh seniors and tied fourth in the Senior Amateur championship. He also had high finishes in the Irish and Scottish championships. David Niven (Newbury & Crookham) also shared fourth place in the Senior Amateur and tied third in the English senior championship. Richard Partridge (Wildernesse) has won both the Irish and Scottish senior championships this season and was runner-up in the Welsh. Mark Stones (Boyce Hill) has had top four finishes in the Welsh, Irish and Scottish seniors this season. The England senior order of merit is used to select the teams with the top four players qualifying automatically for the European team and the top five for the Home Internationals. Two further players are selected for each team. 19 Aug 2015 Champions selected for England senior campaign last_img read more

Artesians Extend Unbeaten Streak With 1-1 Draw Against Vancouver

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Oly Town ArtesiansFor the second time in three days, Kyle Witzel scored the lone goal for the Oly Town Artesians in a 1-1 draw, including the equalizer tonight against the Vancouver Victory at Wembley Soccer Shop Field. Witzel’s 66th minute goal evened things up after Moi Diaz scored for the Victory in stoppage time of the first half. Goalkeeper JJ Olson made four saves in the draw that moved the Artesians to 4-4-3 with 15 points in their inaugural season in the Evergreen Premier League.JJ Olson. Photo courtesy: Charis WilsonIt took over 45 minutes before either team broke through in an evenly played but rough first half. Diaz scored his second goal of the season on a pass from Jessie Garcia just before the half came to an end and gave Vancouver a 1-0 lead going into halftime.The Artesians continued to struggle to put the ball on frame, registering just one shot on goal amongst their seven shots, but that one shot on goal came in the 66th minute when Kyle Witzel received a pass from Alec Zimmerman that made the entire Vancouver defense stop and plead for an offsides call. They did not receive it and Witzel dribbled around Victory goalkeeper Trevor Wilson to score an easy goal to level the game at 1-1.Both teams had fantastic chances in the final 24 minutes including another last second opportunity for the Artesians’ opponent that was foiled and both teams earned a point with the 1-1 draw.Vancouver outshot the Artesians 9-7 including five shots on goal, but they also out-fouled the Artesians, 16-10, including four fouls called on Kazuki Tateishi. Both teams picked up a yellow card, the first to Oly Town’s Sasa Yodkerepauprai in the 41st minute and an 80th minute caution to the Victory’s Kevin Stordahl.The Artesians stayed in fourth place, three points behind the third place Victory, who moved to 5-3-3 with 18 points and are still in the thick of things in the EPLWA race.Oly Town continues their three game homestand on Saturday night when they will try to slow down EPLWA goal king Tyler Bjork and the first place Seattle Stars. First kick is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. and gates open at 5:15 p.m.Follow the Artesians all season long by visiting the Oly Town Artesians website, following them on Twitter, and liking them on Facebook.last_img read more

City of Olympia’s Saturday Drop-Off Site Opens for the 2019 Season

first_imgFacebook39Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of OlympiaThe City of Olympia’s Saturday Drop-Off Site opens for the season on Saturday, March 9, 2019.  The site is located at 1000 10th Avenue SE.  The site is open every Saturday through November 23, 2019, from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. We accept scrap metal, yard debris and traditional recyclables at the site. The site is open on holiday weekends.Yard Debris and Waste – Cost Olympia residents may bring grass, garden clippings, prunings, brambles, brush, and branches. Wood is also acceptable as long as it is untreated and unpainted (nails are okay). Rates are assessed on load size and type of material, pay by cash or check only. Customers are required to unload their own vehicles, so bring only what you can physically handle.Recycle Non-Appliance and Clean Scrap Metal – FREEDo you have any metal waste, such as tools, fencing, fenders, wheels, posts, tanks, wire, or outdoor furniture? Bring them to Olympia’s Saturday Drop-off Site, where we accept clean, non-appliance scrap metal. There is no fee for scrap metal disposal. Please note the following:All plastic must be removed.No fluids or gasses of any kind. For safety reasons, an attendant will check that all units containing oil, hydraulics or transmission fluids, gasoline, other fuels or gasses, etc., have been properly drained or otherwise cleaned. See the web site listed below for more information.Sorry, no paint cans or batteries.No refrigerators, microwaves, television sets, washing machines or other appliances.Traditional Recyclables – FREEDo you have extra recycling from a get together, a recent move, or simply more than your cart can hold? Olympia garbage customers can now bring their extra recyclables at no charge to the Saturday Drop-off Site:PaperCardboardAluminum and tin cansPlastic bottles, jugs, dairy tubsPlastic rigid flower potsPlastic bucketsGlass bottles and jarslast_img read more

VVS Laxman lauds lady auto driver who drove recovered COVID-19 nurse 140 km home

first_imgImage Courtesy: PTI/The Better IndiaAdvertisement 1fNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vslcq7Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ebxrmhi( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9uxvWould you ever consider trying this?😱24cCan your students do this? 🌚bv0Roller skating! Powered by Firework The novel Coronavirus pandemic has seen a number of sportspersons and celebrities taking a step forward to assist the needy people of the society, be it monetary help or with providing necessary commodities. However, a female auto rickshaw driver has set a new example. Meet Eche Laibi Oinam, a lady auto driver from Imphal, Manipur who drove 140 kms at night to drop a COVID-19 discharged nurse to her home, and receives acclamation from none other than Indian cricketing legend VVS Laxman!Advertisement Image Courtesy: PTI/The Better IndiaThe exemplary incident took place back in May. With the start of unlock 1.0 in the country, which imposed a curfew from 9 pm to 5 am, movement of people were restricted between the time frame.Meanwhile, Somichon Chithung, a 22 year old female nurse, who was a patient of COVID-19 and was discharged from the Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences in Imphal on the night of 31st May. However, due to the curfew in place, the hospital ambulance service was refusing to drop her back home, because she is from another district.Advertisement In such a troubling moment, Eche Laibi Oinam appeared as the saviour. The female auto driver took the endeavour to take Chithung back to her home in Skipe village, which was located in the Kamjong district, an 140 km long eight hour journey through the foggy night.Now, former Team India opener VVS Laxman has paid his respect towards Oinam for her generosity.Advertisement “Eche Laibi Oinam,a lady auto-driver from Imphal, dropped a recovered Covid19 Nurse home driving 140 kms @ night after her discharge from a hospital even as others refused service. She drove the entire night to drop the nurse safely at her destination. Kudos to her selfless service,” the 45 year old posted on Instagram today, along with a photo of Oinam and her auto rickshaw.“I was happy that I was at least there for the girl to help, though we were strangers to each other then,” Oinam, mother of two, spoke to EastMojo in an interview.Oinam’s selfless effort to assist the patient in distress was also recognised soon by Manipur Chief Minister N. Biren Singh, who rewarded her with Rs 1.10 lakh back in June.Oinam is also the first female auto driver of Manipur, and operates from the Pangei Bazaar auto stand in Imphal East.“People once laughed at me, taunted and called me names. I felt humiliated. But I had little choice,” the lady, now in her fifties, said in in interview in September 2019. A documentary film titled ‘Auto Driver’ was made based on Oinam’s life, and won multiple awards.If you like reading about MMA, make sure you check out MMAIndia.com Also follow India’s biggest arm wrestling tournament at ProPanja.comAlso read-Eng vs WI 2nd Test Day 2: Stokes and Sibley ensure triumphant day for EnglandOdisha Government and Dutee Chand in conflict after sprinter forced to sell BMW for funds Advertisementlast_img read more

Warriors seeing ‘playoff Andre Iguodala’ in the regular season

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *LOS ANGELES – The Warriors’ trusted veteran has made 3-point shots with dependable accuracy. He has covered the opposing team’s best scorer. He also attacks the basket as if he were in the prime of his career.The Warriors have become accustomed toward Andre Iguodala fulfilling that familiar role in April, May and June. This season, though, Iguodala has done the …last_img read more